La Floresta,

"The Island to Discover" a Temporary exhibition in Menorca

Based on the fact that the exhibition would be temporary and travelling, it was designed as a “little tour” to discover and learn more about the island. A format for touring towns and neighbourhoods, far from conventional exhibitions, drawing on the world of puppeteers and travelling merchants, on world of mouth and oddities.

The exhibition display case was created from a traveller’s trunk that could be unpacked when it reached each site and the contents folded out around it, without any set itinerary. Three trunks that open up and become large tables that visitors can read at their own pace, structuring the contents into three focal points: Discover Menorca, Menorca as a Biosphere Reserve and The Future. These sections were represented, respectively, as a model, newspaper and postcard. Simple resources that make contents accessible to visitors.

 

Start Date 15/02/2016
End Date Paused
Title Temporary exhibition Menorca Biosphere Reserve "The Island to Discover"
Mission Project
Typology Traveling exhibition
Location Menorca. Different Locations
Area Variable
Develper Government of the Balearic Islands, Menorca Insular Council
Budget €27,401.69 (PEM)
Architects Francesc Pla, Eva Serrats
Collaborators Giovanna de Caneva (project), Cristina Brun (project), Adrianna Mas (project), Guillem Bigas (project), MEDITERRANEUM Cultura, turismo y medio ambiente, KULTURA Ideas y estrategias para el patrimonio, Goñi Studio (graphic design), Grup Grop (assembly).

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